Dr Carl Leggo (1953-2019)

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Dr Carl Leggo on March 7th, 2019.  The CSEA/SCEA sends sincere condolences to his family, friends, students and colleagues. His influence and knowledge will reverberate through our halls infinitely.

Originally from Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Carl was an accomplished poet and scholar. A professor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia, he was renowned for his dedication to living poetically.

His research pursuits included: life writing, a/r/tography, narrative inquiry, poetic inquiry, creative writing, contemplative practices, and arts-based research. He will be sorely missed.

Wor(l)d

in the beginning is

the word

without beginning

the spoken word written

the written word spoken

the word born in the world

the world born in the word

the word is worldly

the world is wordy

the word is in the world

the world is in the word

the word is the world

the world is the word

in the end is

the word

without end

(Leggo, 2012, p. 1)

Leggo, C. (2012). Sailing in a concrete boat. SensePublishers, Rotterdam.

Robert Cameron Steele – January 27, 1925 – August 2, 2018

Robert Cameron Steele

January 27 1925- August 2 2018

It is with great sadness that we announce that, after a brief illness, Bob died Thursday, August 2, 2018. He is survived by his wife Mary, his children, Marne, Beth and David, and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. At Bob’s request, there will be no service.

Bob Steele was born in Mervin, Saskatchewan, in 1925 and his early years there growing up and teaching in one-room schoolhouses influenced both his personality and his developing sense of art and education. He moved his family to British Columbia after graduating from The University of Saskatchewan and taught art at Chilliwack High School and Vancouver School of Art. After teaching at the Vancouver School of Art (which later became Emily Carr University of Art and Design), he came to the Department of Art Education (ARTE) at the University of British Columbia in 1962, where he taught studio printmaking and art methods for 28 years. The Graphics Print Hut west of the Scarfe building was Bob’s domain and many of his collection of the art education students that took Graphics still grace the walls of the Scarfe building. The Graphics sale was a highlight for students and staff during Bob’s years at UBC. He remained a practising artist his whole life but it was only after retirement that he began the “Drawing Network” to encourage the idea that drawing was a language as important as talking or writing. He has published numerous articles and pamphlets and four books, “Draw Me a Story” (1998), “The Drawing Path for Children” (2011), “The Smith Ranch ‘After School’”(2011) and “A Picture Book of Children’s Drawings” (2013). He contended that in their drawings, children can capture degrees of sophistication in perception, understanding and emotion that are far beyond their literacy level. Although it was in his retirement that Bob really began publishing his ideas, his deep beliefs about drawing and children were articulated through his teaching and further refined by many of the students that he encountered in his years at UBC. A book inspired by Bob’s beliefs about art education was published last year and launched at the Faculty of Education. (M. J. Binder & S. Kind (Eds.), Drawing as Language: Celebrating the Work of Bob Steele. 2017 Sense Publishers.) Bob Steele’s legacy in art education will survive in the many art educators he influenced through his teaching and his writing.

 

 

 

In Memorium of Paul Langdon (1947-2017)

On April 11th 2017 Professor Paul Langdon passed away peacefully in New York City, after a long battle with ill health. He is remembered with sadness and much affection by his colleagues in the Department of Art Education, and equally fondly by his students-many of whom have gone on to become art educators. Paul was a member of the Department of Art Education from September 1997 to December 2011″…

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